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Tangible results


After working for several years within the institutional setting of Child Protection Services, moving into private practice immediately opened my eyes to a radically different kind of work that called for new and specific tools. Private work involves diving deep into the psyche of a unique individual - and it can only happen within the framework of a strong partnership. It is a singular, intimate collaboration.

While traditional psychotherapy is a powerful method in itself, I found myself looking to develop additional skills. Given the financial and other pressures that many clients were facing, longer-term therapy was not a realistic option for them. I was therefore particularly attracted to tools that would help bring about measurable, real-life changes for them, typically within months rather than years.

My ensuing research on the effectiveness of various therapeutic methods led me to an anglo-saxon approach - cognitive behavioural therapy or CBT. Highly respected within the medical and scientific communities for its measurable results, CBT is based on the relationship between ideas, emotions and behaviours. It teaches us to challenge false beliefs, to manage our emotions and develop more adaptive behaviours.

With some years of training and several years of practice under my belt, CBT still convinces me of its effectiveness.

  • A key aspect of CBT is its pragmatism. Experiments are undertaken in real-life situations. Skills are learned. Measurements are made. Progress is evaluated and strategies are refined. The work outside the therapeutic setting is as important as that within - after all, the final objective is a happier, more productive daily life.

  • As mentioned earlier, the therapeutic relationship is a corner-stone. The client is sole expert on their subjective experience. The therapist possesses the tools and experience to encourage the client to readjust their position and experiment with different ways of thinking, responding emotionally and reacting. This is only possible within a context of mutual trust and respect.

  • Depending on the kind of issues that are being dealt with, CBT can offer rapid results. Progress is reinforced by the strength of the client’s engagement. A willingness to question long-held beliefs or put aside ingrained habits and test new behaviours is key to success. It is the therapist’s responsibility to find a balance between the client’s motivations, needs and strengths, offering the tools and support which allow them to make change happen.


Tangible results


After working for several years within the institutional setting of Child Protection Services, moving into private practice immediately opened my eyes to a radically different kind of work that called for new and specific tools. Private work involves diving deep into the psyche of a unique individual - and it can only happen within the framework of a strong partnership. It is a singular, intimate collaboration.

While traditional psychotherapy is a powerful method in itself, I found myself looking to develop additional skills. Given the financial and other pressures that many clients were facing, longer-term therapy was not a realistic option for them. I was therefore particularly attracted to tools that would help bring about measurable, real-life changes for them, typically within months rather than years.

My ensuing research on the effectiveness of various therapeutic methods led me to an anglo-saxon approach - cognitive behavioural therapy or CBT. Highly respected within the medical and scientific communities for its measurable results, CBT is based on the relationship between ideas, emotions and behaviours. It teaches us to challenge false beliefs, to manage our emotions and develop more adaptive behaviours.

With some years of training and several years of practice under my belt, CBT still convinces me of its effectiveness.

  • A key aspect of CBT is its pragmatism. Experiments are undertaken in real-life situations. Skills are learned. Measurements are made. Progress is evaluated and strategies are refined. The work outside the therapeutic setting is as important as that within - after all, the final objective is a happier, more productive daily life.

  • As mentioned earlier, the therapeutic relationship is a corner-stone. The client is sole expert on their subjective experience. The therapist possesses the tools and experience to encourage the client to readjust their position and experiment with different ways of thinking, responding emotionally and reacting. This is only possible within a context of mutual trust and respect.

  • Depending on the kind of issues that are being dealt with, CBT can offer rapid results. Progress is reinforced by the strength of the client’s engagement. A willingness to question long-held beliefs or put aside ingrained habits and test new behaviours is key to success. It is the therapist’s responsibility to find a balance between the client’s motivations, needs and strengths, offering the tools and support which allow them to make change happen.